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IMPORTANT!!!

POISON CONTROL INFORMATION

 

Kansas State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital is offering a FREE 24 hours poison control hotline for pet owners and veterinarians. 1+785-532-5679 is the number and the service has been available since 1969.  Dr Oehme, a vet and professor in toxicology and pathology oversees the hotline. 

Dr Oehme offers these suggestions


Be patient.  The person answering the phone may have to take a few minutes
to consult the vet on duty.

Call as soon as possible. Immediate attention might save your animal.  But
waiting to see if there is a reaction could cost your animal their life.

Have any product labels available for answers.  The vet might need to know
milligrams and generic names.

Know your pet. Drooling could only mean he is thrilled to see you!

Know that the toxicologists are also taking calls from vets about other
animals and other problems, including those problems with large animals.

The Italian Greyhound is a curious creature, and many are very bad about chewing on things they find around the yard or home.  It is very possible that what they decide to chew on is toxic. 

For this reason, it's very important to make sure that household chemicals are kept up, and that surfaces cleaned with cleaners are thoroughly dry before allowing the dog back in the area.  Another option is to use cleaners that are non toxic and environmentally friendly.

  • Antifreeze in ANY amount can and will usually kill your dog, or any animal that ingests it.  Unfortunately, one of the ingredients used in most antifreeze products tastes sweet (ethelyne glycol), and so is very attractive to dogs.
  • House plants and plants used in the landscape can pose unique and sometimes deadly hazards to your dog. A list of all toxic plants, in a list from a-z, including common names, scientific names, and the form or level of toxicity can be found at   http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/ Use your "back" button on your browser to return to this page.
  • Pesticides (insecticides and rodenticides), and fertilizers should be kept away from all animals.  Read your labels very carefully.  Limit the use of these chemicals as much as possible in any area where your dog will spend time.  If you are in an area you cannot control, washing the dogs feet as soon as you leave that area is a very good idea.  Do not allow your dog to chew or play with leaves or grass unless you are SURE it hasn't been treated with any sort of chemical. 
  • Cocoa mulch contains the same chemical found in cocoa that makes it toxic to dogs.  The aroma of this mulch is very attractive to dogs.  It should NOT be used in areas your dog will spend time in. 
  • Some common foods can be dangerous for dogs to consume.  These should be avoided at all costs.
  • Dark chocolate and cocoa.  Milk chocolate does not pose the same threat, although it can cause stomach upset.  The active ingredient in fine dark chocolate, cooking chocolate and cocoa is toxic to dogs.  The same ingredient is in milk chocolate, but at a much lower ratio.
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Onions, shallots, garlic (in more than just a minute amount), or any part of the allium family.  These can cause liver failure.
  • Artificial sweeteners such as Splenda, or any product with Aspartame in it.
  • Grapes and raisins.  These can cause kidney and liver damage.  Raisins are more toxic than grapes, as the drying process intensifies the toxic substance.
  • Tea bags and coffee grounds.  The caffeine in these products can cause gastric upset and hyperactivity.
  • Raw salmon can carry a parasite that can be fatal if ingested by dogs. 
  • Medications (over the counter and prescription) are as harmful to dogs as to small children.  Make sure medications (human and animal) are kept out of reach.

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